Hello, Habr! It so happened that my colleague and I today published a scientific article in BioEssays magazine devoted to the analysis of conspiracy theory, which was originally formulated in the form of a post on Habré. It seemed logical to me to publish the analysis not only on my blog, but also here, especially since kind people invited me here.
In early February this year, WHO specialists who visited Wuhan said at a press conference that they exclude [1] the version of the artificial origin of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. The virus probably came from bats through an unknown intermediate host.

Indeed, during the epidemic, a lot of versions appeared in the media about the artificial origin of the coronavirus. Most of them suspected the Wuhan laboratory, but there were also accusations against the United States and even the Russian "Vector". It was argued that SARS-CoV-2 was made using the sequences of the HIV genome, human genes, that this is a coronavirus from a scientific publication in the journal Nature - all this was discussed in detail on the pages of my blog
MeLavi 19 march 2021, 17:36

With the rise of coronavirus (COVID-19), businesses around the world are facing major disruptions. They are struggling to continue business operations and secure their corporate assets. At the same time, employees are combating a tough fight against the virus itself. To make things worse, cybercriminals are riding on this opportunity, trying to make the most of the situation. A couple of weeks ago, Proofpoint researchers discovered coronavirus-themed attacks. Apart from the increase in malicious messages, experts observed a form of attack budding on the fear of purported unreleased cures for coronavirus.

Check what is NOC?

Amid the spread of this global pandemic, employers are tossing between allowing their employees to work from home or continue to operate from the established offices. Regardless, organizations need to consider the risks associated with their data security and data privacy in the wake of potential impact.

As coronavirus is not only affecting one’s health but also the continuous growth of businesses, it is time for them to expand their IT disaster recovery and contingency plans to address unforeseen scenarios. Enterprises need a plan that covers all possible types of fabricated attacks during the rapid emerging outbreak of COVID-19.
aprabha2611 28 may 2020, 16:15