It's hard to argue that the landscape is an integral part of most computer games in open spaces. The traditional method of realizing the change in the relief of the surrounding surface player is the following - take the mesh, which is a plane and for each primitive in this grid, we make a displacement along the normal to this plane by a value specific for this primitive. In simple words, we have a single-channel texture of 256 by 256 pixels and a grid plane. For each primitive from its coordinates on the plane, we take the value from the texture. Now we simply move the coordinates of the primitive along the normal to the plane by the resulting value (Fig. 1)

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Pic.1 map of heights + plane = terrain

Why does this work? If we imagine that the player is on the surface of a sphere, and the radius of this sphere is extremely large in relation to the size of the player, then the curvature of the surface can be neglected and a plane can be used. But what if we do not neglect the fact that we are on the sphere? I would like to share my experience of constructing such landscapes with the reader in this article.
KlauS 6 october 2017, 11:22