The authors of the PVS-Studio analyzer invite you to test your attentiveness.

Code analyzers never get tired and can find errors a human's eye cannot easily notice. We have picked a few code fragments with errors revealed by PVS-Studio, all the fragments taken from well-known open-source projects.

We invite you to take part in a competition against code analyzers to test your agility by trying to find the errors by yourself. You will be offered 15 randomly selected tasks. Every correct answer earns you one score if you give it within 60 seconds. The code fragments are short and 60 seconds is a fair limit.

Let's examine a couple of examples with errors for you to understand how to give the answer.

Andrey2008 18 september 2014, 16:15

OutsourcingAs you know, our main activity is development of the code analyzers PVS-Studio and CppCat. Although we have been doing this for a long time now and - as we believe - quite successfully, an unusual idea struck us recently. You see, we do not use our own tools in exactly the same way our customers do. Well, we analyze the code of PVS-Studio by PVS-Studio of course, but, honestly, the PVS-Studio project is far from large. Also, the manner of working with PVS-Studio's code is different from that of working with Chromium's or LLVM's code, for example.

We felt like putting ourselves in our customers' shoes to see how our tool is used in long-term projects. You see, project checks we regularly do and report about in our numerous articles are done just the way we would never want our analyzer to be used. Running the tool on a project once, fixing a bunch of bugs, and repeating it all again just one year later is totally incorrect. The routine of coding implies that the analyzer ought to be used regularly - daily.

OK, what's the purpose of all that talk? Our theoretical wishes about trying ourselves in third-party projects have coincided with practical opportunities we started to be offered not so long ago. Last year we decided to allocate a separate team in our company to take up - ugh! - outsourcing; that is, take part in third-party projects as a developer team. Moreover, we were interested in long-term and rather large projects, i.e. requiring not less than 2-3 developers and not less than 6 months of development. We had two goals to accomplish:
  • try an alternative kind of business (custom development as opposed to own product development);
  • see with our own eyes how PVS-Studio is used in long-term projects.
We have successfully solved both tasks. But this article is not about the outsourcing business; it is about our experience. We don't mean the organizational experience - there are plenty of articles about that. We mean the experience of working with the code of third-party projects. This is what we want to tell you about.
Andrey2008 23 june 2014, 6:52

I have studied numbers of errors caused by using the Copy-Pate method and can assure you that programmers most often tend to make mistakes in the last fragment of a homogeneous code block. I have never seen this phenomenon described in books on programming, so I decided to write about it myself. I called it the "last line effect".

Andrey2008 2 june 2014, 6:03

I'm currently experiencing a strong cognitive dissonance, and it won't let me go. You see, I visit various programmers' forums and see topics where people discuss noble ideas about how to write super-reliable classes; somebody tells he has his project built with the switches -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -Weffc++, and so on. But, God, where are all these scientific and technological achievements? Why do I come across most silly mistakes again and again? Perhaps something is wrong with me?

Andrey2008 3 april 2014, 10:29

I'm going on to tell you about how programmers walk on thin ice without even noticing it. Let's speak on shift operators <<, >>. The working principles of the shift operators are evident and many programmers even don't know that using them according to the C/C++ standard might cause undefined or unspecified behavior.
Andrey2008 16 april 2012, 10:25

imageKaren Sandler (Executive Director of the GNOME Foundation) was diagnosed with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which greatly increases the probability of death from heart problems some time ago. She was recommended to implant a cardiostimulator. Karen got very curios and asked a few questions such as: “What kind of the software is running in it? Can she take a look at the code, before she will trust it with her life?”, but no one could give her clear answers.

It turned out that all medical devices get certified by FDA organization (Food and Drug Administration) in the USA, which has never conducted the review of source code until some problem may happen to the device’s software. Instead, FDA relies on the manufacturer's report, which includes all the information about it. In addition, this document meets the general standards that are required in this case.
Tags: code
Pirat 1 february 2012, 21:20