A story about the sense of vision, the perception of frames and the refresh rate, motion blur and television screens.
Introduction
You could hear the term frames per second (FPS), and that 60 FPS is really a good reference for any animation. But most console games go for 30 FPS, and movies are usually recorded on 24 FPS, so why should we aim for 60 FPS?
Frames ... per second?
The early days of filmmaking
image
The shooting of the 1950 Hollywood film Julius Caesar with Charlton Heston

When the first cinematographers began to make films, many discoveries were made not by a scientific method, but by trial and error. The first cameras and projectors were manually controlled, and the film was very expensive - so expensive that when trying to shoot, they tried to use the smallest possible frame rate, just to save the film. This threshold was usually between 16 and 24 FPS.
Skull 1 november 2017, 11:35

"I can send the IP packet to Europe faster than I can send a pixel to the screen. How f’d up is that?" John Carmack asked in his Tweeter. His tweet caused a broad resonance in the community, so Carmack explained that to measure the lag on Sony HMZ-T1 analog display he used a program that changes the contents of the buffer by pressing a button on the controller, and a screen with the video camera 240 fps. Then he counted the number of frames between pressing the button and changing pixel.
Skull 3 may 2012, 17:00