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Surely, you paid attention to the computer using which the young John Connor hacked PIN-code to the ATM and the access code to the lab in Terminator 2. This computer was the Atari Portfolio. When the movie was showing in theaters in 1991, it seemed beyond the fiction. I was lucky to find it, and I want to share with you its features.
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Killer 4 february 2013, 13:02

The article will concern the work of “brains”, which operate the engine of your car or motorbike. I will try to explain as simply as possible and in general, what and how is going on.

What do these “brains” do and what are they for? Electronics is an alternative to other systems performing the same functions. The carburetor used to deal with fuel metering, the ignition used to be operated by the mechanical or vacuum advance measure of the ignition advance. In general it can be realized not by electronics alone and it used to be just this way for quite a long time. On the cars, motorbikes, petrol-powered saws, petrol generators and other places worked and keep working the same systems that are to substitute the injector.
Why was it needed to change anything? Why should the existed, proved and rather reliable system be repealed? It is quite simple – a pursuit of economy, ecology and power. Work accuracy of the written above systems is not enough for the supply of the desired level of ecology and powerfulness, electronic systems of the engine controls began to appear long ago.
Tags: AFR, injector, MAF
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Killer 7 may 2012, 18:14

"I can send the IP packet to Europe faster than I can send a pixel to the screen. How f’d up is that?" John Carmack asked in his Tweeter. His tweet caused a broad resonance in the community, so Carmack explained that to measure the lag on Sony HMZ-T1 analog display he used a program that changes the contents of the buffer by pressing a button on the controller, and a screen with the video camera 240 fps. Then he counted the number of frames between pressing the button and changing pixel.
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Skull 3 may 2012, 17:00

imageEven though I use an ultrabook for several months, I saw it from inside only recently.
(Yes, you understood correctly. This is the XXI century, and a remote access is available for both the ultrabook and an ordinary computer).
Thereafter, I was not interested in the technical specifications of ultrabook, but I wondered about its physical parameters, and they did not disappoint me. Ultrabook was really slim. It could be even hidden under a sheet of paper.
Its weight has exceeded all expectations. Yes, the ultrabook is light, but it is not ultra light. My Asus Zenbook UX31E (as well as other models, including the Lenovo IdeaPad U300s and Dell XPS 13) weights 2.8 puonds.
To be more precise it weighed before. We were able to reduce its weight by almost 1.1 pounds!
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Pirat 27 april 2012, 15:24

Hello dear colleagues!

imageToday I would like to talk about electronics that I work with in my spare time, namely it is a racing car engine control.
Let's start describing the situation as a whole. In the car racing often the result does not depend only on a sportsman as in many other sports, but also it depends upon the equipment that sportsman uses. So, there is needed a professional approach to training and tuning up the racing car. Of course, there are a lot of nuances. But if we roughly divide this into the parts, we will get the chassis adjustment and engine tuning. Today I would like to tell you what electronics is used to tune up the engine of racing cars.

The modern racing engine (and the engine in your car) is controlled by a specific computer: Electronic Control Unit. It controls all processes that are going on inside and all on-board electronics. The most popular solutions are manufactured by the companies, such as Motec and Pectel. I am using in my car Motec M800, which is going to be as an example that I will discuss how it works.
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Killer 8 april 2012, 20:07

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Let's just discuss the time scale. The processor of your computer lives by the nanoseconds: the majority of the CPU can do several things for one nanosecond; generally, these are the simple math and the comparisons. To make this perception easer, we assume that you are the processor, and instead of nanoseconds you live and work second by second. In order to make it clear, we apply this metaphor to the single-core processor.
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Killer 3 march 2012, 13:22

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Recently, in the global computer press has begun to appear quite a few articles on the topic "Why RAID-5 is bad” (here are some examples: one, two, and others).

We will try to explain why RAID-5 has worked so far, but now it suddenly stopped.

The capacity of hard drives has been growing without any specific tendency to a stoppage over the past few years. In addition, the capacity of the drives almost doubles every year, but their data transfer rate does not increase much over the same period. Yes, indeed, the drives get interfaces, such as SATA and SATA-II, and SATA-III is on its way, but there is a question “would these drives work faster?” or they just get new interfaces with the numbers of theoretical characteristics.
The usage of hard drives tells us that the capacity grows and the speed does not.
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Skull 23 january 2012, 15:55

imageIBM Research scientists have successfully demonstrated the ability to store one bit of information in as few as 12 magnetic atoms. Today’s disk drives use about one million atoms to store a single bit of information. The ability to manipulate matter by its most basic components — atom by atom — could lead to the vital understanding necessary to build smaller, faster and more energy-efficient devices.
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Killer 18 january 2012, 16:25

MIT researchers have created a new camera that can acquire visual data at a rate of one trillion exposures per second (1 000 000 000 000 = 10^12). That’s fast enough to produce a slow-motion video of a burst of light traveling the length of a one-liter bottle, bouncing off the cap and reflecting back to the bottle’s bottom. The similar devices will be used in medicine and other branches of science in the future.
Tags: camera, MIT, shutter
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Siera 14 december 2011, 15:31

We tested several configurations of disk arrays that are suitable for use in servers.
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We tested the following configurations:
    4 x 300GB SAS2 10K + RAID10 on a PCI-E 2.0 controller (Reference 4 x 300GB RAID10)
    PCI-E SSD 120GB MLC (Inexpensive PCI-E SSD 120GB)
    2 x SSD 120GB MLC + RAID0 on a PCI-E 2.0 controller with optimized firmware (Inexpensive 2 х SSD 120GB RAID0)
    4 x 300GB SAS2 10K + RAID10 on a PCI-E 2.0 controller + SSD MLC 120GB caching I/O (Hybrid 4 x 300GB RAID10 + SSD caching)

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Spy 9 december 2011, 5:34
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